IPO Question - Page 1

Pedigree Database

Workingline and DDR GSD for Sale DM Clear
Female for sale

Champion Bloodline GSD Puppies
Puppies for sale

Exceptional 18 month old male $5000.00
Male for sale

by GSCat on 13 July 2018 - 11:07

If the dog doesn't bite the sleeve, but bites (and holds) the decoy someplace else (in this case, the crotch), is this an automatic fail or disqualification? Is this a training issue, or did the decoy do something wrong/fail to do something/miss the catch? She did out immediately on command (whew!) What happens if the dog actually causes injury to the decoy during IPO?

In real life, I don't care where a bad guy gets bit, and I don't want to give a bad guy an advantage if s/he's familiar with police K9/IPO, so I don't want to teach the dog not to bite some places, or only bite the sleeve.  Or not reengage/bite again if a bad guy schucks his/her clothing.

 

by Gertrude Besserwisser on 13 July 2018 - 16:07

Answer to question No.1. Yes it is an automatic disqualification. If the dog merely bumps the helper, it is not. If it nips the helper, it is at the judge's discression if it releases quickly without command.

Answer to question No.2. It is a training issue. Properly trained IPO dogs will not go for the body. For IPO most dogs should be trained in prey drive. They will automatically or channel their drive into defense and pack drive in the blind or after the reattack.

Answer to question No.3 Ask the helper what happens if the dog causes him injury. Ask your lawyer. Did you sign a hold harmless agreement. Did you agree to be liable for injury...

Personal protection training is very different from IPO protection training. Training a dog for both is probably a mistake as dogs are black and white thinkers and are likely to get confused if you train both. I have seen tnis all the time when someone trains for both IPO obedience and AKC style obedience. The dog does one or the other, but not both...

by GSCat on 13 July 2018 - 20:07

Thanks.

Legally all is well. Paperwork , etc. was done before any training started. Here, consent, as in sports, training, etc. is an absolute defense/release. Around here is everyone signs the agreement and is responsible for fixing their own injuries and own dog(s)' injuries.

Medically, all became well fairly quickly.

I was hoping to title before breeding, but her primary purpose is law enforcement/handler protection (yes, I own the dog).



Koots

by Koots on 13 July 2018 - 23:07

A dog is quite capable of being trained in different disciplines at the same time, with proper training and handling, provided the handler/trainer makes things different enough so the dog has no confusion. For example, my dog is trained in English and German commands for different executions of the same basic task, like heeling. On our walks in the area, he is told to 'heel' which means loosely at my side but not formally. When we train IPO-style obedience, the 'fuss' command is given for precision heeling. Another example is that my dog is trained to do IPO-style tracking, and SAR-style. Different commands and different equipment makes it clear to the dog which task he is asked to do.    It takes more thought from the person but it is not difficult.


by GSCat on 14 July 2018 - 07:07

Thank you.

Maybe Mandarin or Cantonese for IPO, then. I like the sound of the languages and it's different enough from what she already knows/hears that there wouldn't be as big of a chance for a mix-up.

Some of the equipment we're using is already different... law enforcement stuff you need to be able to wash/sanitize and stand up to brutal use/conditions. And sometimes stuff has to be repaired in the field so it might look less-than perfect, although perfectly serviceable. Some of her law enforcement gear has been to hell and back, but it's like the Energizer Bunny and keeps on going and going and going... it would probably give the judges a poor impression, so I wouldn't want her to compete in it. OTOH, I would never take a nice leather leash/lead/collar/harness on the street, but it sure looks nice. OK for IPO or conformation.

 

by ZweiGSD on 14 July 2018 - 14:07

My opinion for what it's worth:  I would not cross train a law enforcement or personal protection dog in IPO bitework.  When I need that dog to bite I want it to bite wherever it can with no hesitation.  I don't want it to have to think for even one second, "Is this IPO or real life?"

   
I have seen numerous videos where IPO helpers lose their sleeve and the dog runs around with the sleeve in it's mouth.  For IPO that's fine and keeps the helper safe.  For LE/PP that is unacceptable - they shoud spit it and re-engage immediately.

 

 

 

 

by GSCat on 15 July 2018 - 22:07

She does...

For IPO, what happens if the dog reengages the decoy after she has the sleeve? Or do I simply need to call her off if she drops the sleeve to reengage (or before she does)?

Thanks.


You must be logged in to reply to posts










Contact information  Disclaimer  Privacy Statement  Copyright Information  Terms of Service  Cookie policy  ↑ Back to top 

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!