Cow-hocks in puppies - Page 1

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by zyna on 03 April 2004 - 14:04

hello everyone, When you look at a 6-8 week old puppy, is it possible to tell of its hind legs are cow-hocked? Many thanks.
Dog1

by Dog1 on 04 April 2004 - 05:04

Puppies that are cow hocked can grow out of it. Check the parents. It's about the best you can do. They seem to straighten out around 4 to 6 months old. Larger dogs may take a little longer. My Ursus line dogs have always concerned me, but always come through in the end for example. Wait and see.

by JanisNovak on 05 April 2004 - 01:04

Large, young males can look particularly funky in the rear but you need to give them time. Every one I've had that seems loose and cow-hocked has been out of it by 8-10 months. JDN - US

by zyna on 05 April 2004 - 10:04

Thank you very much for your answers. I would like to ask if you would you buy an 8-week-old female puppy whose long hock bones are twisted in relation to each other so that its feet turn sharply out?

Dog1

by Dog1 on 06 April 2004 - 01:04

Eight week old puppies are a risk. Cow hocks, ears, teeth, testicles, working ability, pasterns, structure,etc,etc,,,, are all subject to change from week to week. Look at what the puppy is, look at where it came from. Decide if the price is right for you. Does the breeder have a program and reputation you want to support? If the answer is yes, take your chances. If all you want is a pet, no big deal. It can be a good pet even if the cow hock does not go away.

by troll on 06 April 2004 - 02:04

"Eight week old puppies are a risk. Cow hocks, ears, teeth, testicles, working ability, pasterns, structure,etc,etc,,,, are all subject to change from week to week. Look at what the puppy is, look at where it came from. Decide if the price is right for you". Dog 1, you actually put it in a nutshell. If all you want is a pet then pay only the price of a pet. If a breeder is basing their asking price (anything over $1000.00), on the fact that the puppy is show quality, or the hips will be certifiable, or that there are no genetic faults (iea heart murmurs, epilephsy, faulty ears, extra or missing teeth) then expect a written guarantee to state such. If you are looking at an eight week old pup, then you and the breeder should be able to access a fair price with an acceptable guarantee for the amount of "risk" for your investment. Don't even entertain "return" of the failure (you keep the first pup with proof of spay or neutor), as you are expected to be emotionally attached, accept nothing less than 1/2 your money back or a full replacement with the same guarantee. And clearly define the hip guarantee, as some breeders will consider a "hip guarantee" as being only replacable if the pup is diagnosed with crippling hip displasia (the pup cannot get up and walk). Also consider, why would someone want to "import" a pup. Of course to make money. So keep in mind that if they are going to bring the "product" over to you, then they are gong to charge a fee, then expect them to protect your investment and put your contract in writing. If we all become smarter about our investments, we will eliminate the "international" puppy mills also.

by HOWDEDO on 06 April 2004 - 06:04

A friend of mine had nasty problems with cowhocks in pups. Eventually, he had to watch the weight of his pups very very closely, since every extra ounce of weight seemed to add to the problem. At the end, there were still pups who had weak hocks.

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