What type of work should I do with him 8 months old. His pedigree - Page 2

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Sunsilver

by Sunsilver on 22 February 2021 - 17:02

The dog has a lot of working schutzhund dogs in its pedigree. My suggestion would be to find the nearest schutzhund club, and have them assess the dog, and see if has the right temperament.

If it doesn't have what it takes for protection, the owner can still learn obedience and tracking with the club's help.

by GSCat on 22 February 2021 - 23:02

Regardless of what you end up doing with/using the dog for, the dog needs basic obedience and manners, including housebreaking.

Canine Good Citizen (CGC) is inexpensive, is not difficult, will teach you and the dog needed skills, will give you and your dog experience with a third party evaluating you, and, depending on where you are, might reduce insurance premiums or allow you to rent someplace that doesn't allow dogs without CGC. Or it might allow you to bring your dog into certain places. If you end up doing therapy work or some other things, some places require one or all levels of CGC.

AKC also has sanctioned matches for novice handlers for both conformation and performance events.

A local working or sport dog club might be able to help evaluate your dog's strengths, weaknesses, and potential, training, club matches/competitions, etc.




Hundmutter

by Hundmutter on 23 February 2021 - 05:02

Indeed, GSCat, utmost importance (though of course just from the OP's question we don't already know whether or not he's dong the basics).

Can I ask all for views / the answer to this question:
I appreciate that a dog needs the genetic base for the sort of good strong drives that will make it most suitable for the working disciplines and those that include bitework; and that its pointless expecting to get very far in an area to which its not suited by that. But how does the novice (if the OP fits that description) work out what it takes many of us years, and numbers of dogs observed, to identify ? Rather than just picking something 'cos its easily locally available , or the OP likes the look of it, I mean. I'm leaning to what GSCat says about joining a club first anyway, because there you can connect with more experienced people and get guidance on what exactly are your dog's strengths ?

Hundmutter

by Hundmutter on 23 February 2021 - 05:02

Indeed, GSCat, utmost importance (though of course just from the OP's question we don't already know whether or not he's doing the basics).

Can I ask all for views / the answer to this question:
I appreciate that a dog needs the genetic base for the sort of good strong drives that will make it most suitable for the working disciplines and those that include bitework; and that its pointless expecting to get very far in an area to which its not suited by that. But how does the novice (if the OP fits that description) work out what it takes many of us years, and numbers of dogs observed, to identify ? Rather than just picking something 'cos its easily locally available , or the OP likes the look of it, I mean. I'm leaning to what GSCat says about joining a club first anyway, because there you can connect with more experienced people and get guidance on what exactly are your dog's strengths ?

Hired Dog

by Hired Dog on 23 February 2021 - 07:02

Hund, if you pick a dog because its local or because you like the looks of, well, you will end up with what you deserve.
In some cases that may be what you want and in others not so much.
It does help if one, especially when not experienced, goes to a breeder who is experienced and knows how to pick puppies for specific needs and desires.
My breeder had me sitting and cooling my heels for a year, even though she had a couple of litters during that time, because according to her, MY type of dog was not in any of them.
I hated the waiting but I appreciated the honesty and I waited and I am very thankful I did, so, I always suggest that new people go a real breeder and let that breeder pick a dog for them according to what they want.
That may be a pet type dog to hang out on the couch with or a rally obedience prospect or your next working police dog or whatever makes one happy.

by ValK on 23 February 2021 - 20:02

Alewis21
irregardless of suitability to any type of work first thing would be to start obedience.
for experienced dog handler 8 month more than enough to figure out his/her dog's specific but if you not yet know, teaching obedience
(preferably with help from experienced handler) will give you better knowledge about your dog and which field of next training dog could
prove itself at his best.

Hundmutter

by Hundmutter on 25 February 2021 - 07:02

Sorry about the double post above, I was in the middle of an edit when I lost the ability to communicate !  For some reason I kept getting suddenly automatically 'logged out'; seems to have been put right now, so Thanks to GSD Admin for his help !

@Hired: I was talking about Clubs, not dogs, in the bit about just choosing something local that appealed to you.  Could end up being Dock Diving.  ;-D

I think this OP has been reading the intro to GSDs in all those general Dog Breeds Encyclopedias.  They all seem to major on Sheps being the all-round dog for every canine pastime.  That does not take into account the genetic capability of some bloodlines / types of GSD for serious 'work'.  Depends what sort of level the OP wants to get involved in / finds he has a dog capable of doing well.

 

I would still like to know how members feel the inexperienced owner finds out about their dog's capabilities, if they do not already know much about what its breeding is based on and they are not in contact with more informed GSD people through a Club or Training Facility etc.?


Hired Dog

by Hired Dog on 25 February 2021 - 08:02

Hund, call me cynical, but, I do not put much emphasis on clubs to tell you what kind of dog you have. Most of them are interested in one thing, whatever discipline they have created the club for and if that is dock diving, for example, and your dog is a great candidate for IPO, too bad, your dog is not good enough for us.

The other lunacy you mentioned about a GSD being a great all around dog for everything dog related is also BS. Even though the breed has distinguished itself in being capable of several disciplines, I am not going to pick one to retrieve my game if I were a hunter, there are better suitable breeds for that.
People buy a GSD and automatically, believe that they have a protection dog, a police dog and a herding dog, just because the dog is a GSD.
Again, those people need to find an experienced breeder who will direct them, according to their choices, to a particular puppy in a litter, if there is one.
If for whatever reason you get your dog through a "non reputable" source, find a trainer who specializes in what you want your dog to do and have that person evaluate your dog.
I cannot think of any other ways to have your dog looked and determine what it would be best at, work, sport or just a couch ornament.

Rik

by Rik on 25 February 2021 - 11:02

most of this has been covered, but it comes down to what is the dog capable of, what the owner is interested in and what is available.

the owner needs help in assessing these things as most novices do. if they are lucky to have clubs in the area, I would check them out. everybody starts somewhere. some clubs are very helpful to new comers, some not so much.

my first formal training class many years ago was an AKC obedience club. both my dog and myself benefited greatly. a good foundation in obedience is useful no matter what future direction is taken.

jmo,
Rik


Hundmutter

by Hundmutter on 26 February 2021 - 03:02

Could not agree more with your last sentence, Rik. That's why I agreed so quickly with what GSCat posted.

I think it is important to get those basics in first, not least because it helps to start each new owner really getting the 'bond' with their dog. It is also surely useful, if you are then getting your dog assessed for potential abilities with some trainer or experienced breeder, to have some control over your young dog while doing that.

To follow on your example, Pet Obedience is NOT e.g. Ringcraft, "but it bloody helps !"; as much as anything because such classes teach the owner how to be calm and consistent in what they ask the dog for.

Or at least they do if they are a Club worth belonging to.

Am conscious of what Duke said recently elsewhere about Training Clubs becoming less helpful, because of the 'one size fits all' attitude of some these days. While I don't know how bad that's gotten in the States, I agree it is certainly true of some Clubs over here - but in the UK these do tend to be the local Pet Obedience type, and not so much those training for IGP etc, AFAIK.  However, they are still a place to make some of those personal contacts, and links with regular breeders &/or people actively engaged and experienced in various disciplines.






 


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