Anybody know what's up with this dog or the seller? Has anybody heard of the seller or the dog? - Page 2

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by GSCat on 22 August 2020 - 22:08

The seller wants 4k for that dog ???   That, right there, is another of GSCat's 'big red flags' to me ...

The dog was supposedly 120 pounds.  Looked overweight in the pic.  Maybe they were trying to recoup the cost of the dog food he ate  😳

 

 


by ValK on 23 August 2020 - 00:08

GSCat
duke somewhere earlier posted link to excerpt from old video all service breeds competition in DDR. there are one rottweiler, who perhaps weight same if no more but simply enjoyable to see how effortless that dog take over 2 m (it's 6½ feet) VERTICAL wall.
as long as weight consist bones and muscles, it wouldn't create any problem for dog.
problem when people do produce in breeding big but loose dogs.
particularly such dogs noticeable in show and back yard breeding with a claim of producing old school DDR type :)

by GSCat on 23 August 2020 - 07:08

Valk--

I agree that if the weight is good weight (muscle, bone, tendons, ligaments, proper amount of fat, etc.) then the weight isn't a health problem.

However, if the weight is bad weight (too much fat and flab), then it is a health, conditioning/exercise, and/or feeding issue. From what I saw in the photo, the dog looked like he was carrying a lot (too much) fat/flab. I could be wrong because photos aren't seeing the dog in person, but that's what it looked like to me.

Watching a properly trained and conditioned dog of any breed perform its tasks well is always a joy 😍


by Hired Dog on 23 August 2020 - 07:08

Weight is weight and excess weight in ANY form is a health concern, end of. It makes no difference if its fat or muscle, when you are seriously over weight, it poses a health concern.
Humans and animals are not supposed to be over weight in a manner that impacts daily activities or health.
I have lived this in the body building world where for the last decade or so, the bigger you are, the better you are BS and as a result, you have 350 pound humans in stage ready condition dropping dead.
A dog that is supposed to be 80 pounds in peak condition should never be 120 pounds because it looks massive or anything else.

by ValK on 23 August 2020 - 13:08

may i ask - excess in regard of what and who have decided that 80lbs is perfect weight for dog?
what to do with pocket sized breeds and the breeds, producing 200lbs dogs?

i don't accept comparison of dog to anything other than dog and related kind species.
dog don't take steroids and do not pump iron with purpose to increase own volume.
dogs, who today by the sport aficionados be considered too big and too heavy (45~50kg.) was considered optimal for patrol dog service and didn't bring health, agility and sustainability problems. and believe me, the strength and agility exercises in training of dogs for a real life uses was much tougher and demanding that in IPO.

answering your remark in another topic about comparison of present slim type as advantageous for sustainable lasting in physical activity - it's false belief. single advantage which this light type brings in is picturesqueness of speed and dynamic of action. that's all. it's good for spectacle but enough only for short burst.
in another topic about dog named Putin, i touched this subject - correlation between dog's structure and physical efficiency.
OP of that topic posted two pictures, one is Utz from breeding back in 40's and another is Zorro of 80's
both about same size but comparing them very easy to note big difference in structure. Utz were bred for herding purpose and his structure very much resembles the wolf - good proportion between front and back parts which provides very good capability for long sustainable run and lasting capacity to be in state of physical activity.
Zorro was bred when the sport with short but dynamic activity utilization took over and it's clearly reflected in his structure.


by Hired Dog on 23 August 2020 - 13:08

Valk, if you cannot understand how carrying extra weight can be detrimental to one's health, I cannot convince you, nor do I want to.
I am not a sport aficionado, no idea what IPO requires, but, I know for a fact what it takes to work a dog in 108 degrees on a daily basis. Personally, I want a dog that is of good weight, 80 pounds is plenty for me, but, that can last during a long search.
Physical structure is great and I agree that it is very important, but, I also believe that carrying any excess size, be it muscle or fat, its not healthy.
Dogs may not take steroids or pump iron to get huge, but, the results of carrying extra weight are the same, for anyone.

by apple on 23 August 2020 - 14:08

A larger dog might very well tire sooner than a smaller dog, but not all large dogs are carrying “extra” weight. Some dogs are just simply larger with more pelvic muscle mass, larger bone and longer. I think it also depends on what the dog is used for. Some of these smaller MalX’s that weigh 45-60 pound can be tenacious biters but up against a very large, strong man can easily be ineffective or injured if the man is particularly tough, aggressive or on certain drugs.

by xPyrotechnic on 23 August 2020 - 15:08

http://www.pedigreedatabase.com/german_shepherd_dog/dog.html?id=17989-rex-vom-haus-iris

Large dogs with big bones and muscle mass and possibly weighs about 45kg or more has a different function than:

https://en.working-dog.com/dogs-details/31703/Xito-vom-Baruther-Land

This is more of a police dog type structure than Rex

by Hired Dog on 23 August 2020 - 17:08

Apple, if you are going to ask me to stand behind a 50 pound dog, it will be a pit of my choosing. My opinion still stands on the size issues I spoke of earlier.



by apple on 23 August 2020 - 17:08

Yes, you would have to find the right pit because historically they were selected away from human aggression. Clearly there are some pit bulls that are aggressive toward humans and they can have extreme tenacity/gameness.
Probably why you see they in KNPV Mal X’s.





 


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