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Yorkshire Terrier > Beware Of Rare Colored Yorkshire Terrier's (19 replies)

by Yorkie Yakker on 13 September 2010 - 19:09

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Joined: Mon Sep 13, 2010 06:41 pm
Don't be duped by "breeders" selling "rare colored" Yorkshire Terriers or any other breed. This is nothing but a sales pitch to get more money for sub-standard and non-standard "designer" puppies. These "rare colored" Yorkies are bred for ONE TRAIT ONLY: COLOR! You will not see these "rare" puppies being offered for sale by any responsible hobby or exhibitor breeder. These "rare" colors are mostly offered for sale by the puppy mills and back yard breeders who's sole agenda is to make money. These "rare colored Yorkis" are more than likely a mix breed as the Yorkshire Terrier does not carry the color white. The parti/piebald, chocolate, white, black and blond/gold genes were added years before A.K.C. Mandatory D.N.A. requirements by mixing Yorkis with another toy dog that carried those genes. Possibly a Papillon, Pomerainian, Shih-Tzu, Chihuahua, Maltese, Toy Fox Terrier or Rat Terrier was bred in..It is believed that there was an "oops" breeding in that kennel introducing the parti gene into the Yorkie gene pool. Fast forward 20+ years of breeding back and forth to standard Yorkis and you have your parti colored Yorki.
As you can see by the history of the Yorkshire Terrier, none of these parti colored dogs were used when developing the breed, not even the Maltese.(who wants to breed in white hair of incorrect texture when developing a blue/tan silky dog??) And you can also see that the "rare colored Yorkis" don't even come close, conformationally, to a true, well bred Yorkshire Terrier.( Ever notice that most chocolate Yorkis look like Chihuahuas?) Most breeders that breed only for the "rare" colors are only interested in color to the exclusion of everything else, including health problems and soundness in the breed. When they see "color", they see dollar signs only, Breeding only for the parti color can be risky because doubling up on the parti gene can result in blindness and bilateral or unilateral deafness, the latter which can ONLY be diagnosed by a Baer test. Ask any parti breeder for proof of a Baer test done on all of their parti dogs or puppies for sale. It is very doubtful any of these "breeders" can show you any test results. In fact, it has only been recently that the "parti breeders" even added a paragraph about parti gene deafness on their web site. And that only happened AFTER it was brought to their attention via a chat forum, by concerned reputable breeders.(5/2009) The "parti breeders" deny any health problems regarding deafness in their dogs.(Funny how ALL the other breeder sites that breed parti/piebald dogs have parti health problem occurrences information written on their sites, such as the Bulldog, Papillons, Great Dane, Boxers, Aussies, etc)
*T-Cups, Apple Head, Pocket Puppies,Micro Mini, Thimble Size or Baby Doll Faced Yorkies are also another sales pitch by unethical breeders only interested in money. These non-standard "Yorkies" have many health problems as, again, they are only bred for ONE TRAIT ONLY and for one reason only. Epilepsy, seizures, breathing problems, open fontanel and horrible patella problems are just a few related health problems. Many are always sick and have short life spans. Let alone normal eating issues.
*There are also plenty of unethical "breeders" of standard colored Yorkis out there. Most of these "back yard breeders" have no interest in the breed except to make a few extra bucks. These "breeders", by far, have done the most damage to the Yorkshire Terrier breed. Over size, under size, huge floppy ears, long terrier faces, incorrect soft coats, incorrect colors, bad top lines are what you can expect to buy from back yard breeders and pet stores. Almost none of them are aware nor do they care about the health problems specific to the Yor

by Yorkie Yakker on 13 September 2010 - 19:09

Posts: 20
Joined: Mon Sep 13, 2010 06:41 pm
Unfortunately, its a "dog eat dog" world out there. Please do your research and find a reputable breeder of Yorkshire Terriers. Most puppies from reputable show/hobby breeders are much less costly up front and in the long run. Reputable breeders care about their puppies and care who they sell them too. Waiting lists are common, but a quality puppy that is backed by the breeder is well worth the wait!! www.YTCA.org is a great place to start looking for your puppy.
Be alert for scams from Nigeria or "Christians that moved to go to Africa", military people being deployed over seas and many others!! One example is that they claim that they have a T-cup/female Yorkie and only want the cost of shipping for the dog. This is a SCAM!!! If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.
With the invention of the internet, scams and poor quality Yorkies (and any other breed)is out of control. The internet makes for cheap advertising, beautiful and mis-leading web-sites complete with stolen show pictures, and a way for a seller to ship puppies without the buyer ever having to see the type of kennel the puppy came from.




MORE INFORMATION ON THE RARE COLOUR CASH CRAZE

Has the Yorkshire Terrier breed gone the way of the Chihuahua, Pomeranian, Poodle, Labrador Retriever and American Cocker Spaniel? All of these breeds have cropped up with parti, merle, silver or other non-standard colors around the same time that "designer breeds" and "alphabet soup registries" were formed.. Most of these non-standard colors were found to be in back yard breeder, puppy mill, and unethical breeder kennels only, many after the loss of A.K.C. breeding rights. The introduction of these non-standard color genes is as easy as pie, so to speak. Introduce these colours by mixing breeds that normally carry these genes and breed it to an A.K.C. Yorki and, Shazam!, you have introduced the parti gene. Ta Da!!! It's easy to fool A.K.C. so register the parti carrier offspring as full A.K.C Yorkie pups. Keep breeding back and forth, parti mutt to A.K.C. registered Yorki, and you will eventually have a parti colored "Yorki mutt" that is A.K.C. registered and that looks very close to the real thing! The only thing to remember is that you don't use the stud dog enough that he requires mandatory D.N.A. testing by A.K.C.

The AKC should insist on testing ALL their dogs EVERY mating to Sire & Dam, as absolute proof that it is a Yorki to stop scams where breeders are adding a Biewer into their mix.It is a Great money making venture, dont you think? For all these parti breeders. Just look at the "parti yorki" and look at the prices!! CAN WE SAY CHA-CHING!!!!! These "breeders" claim that these parti Yorkis are 100% Yorkshire Terrier and that most Yorki carry the parti gene, including the top breeder lines. If that is correct, according to the parti breeders, then why are there no parti colored Silky Terriers since the Yorki is one of the breeds used to develop the Silky Terrier?? Where are all the parti colored Yorki in France, Italy, Ireland, England, Scotland, Australia, Mexico, Spain, etc. The American Parti breeders just will not admit that their parti Yorkis are nothing more than a mix that got their start way before A.K.C. mandatory D.N.A. testing was available.(pre 1990) The parti breeders #1 goal is to make the YTCA (Yorkshire Terrier Club of America) change the standard of the breed to include "rare" colors in order to be shown at A.K.C. conformation shows. Their "ace in the hole" is their parti carrier dogs(dogs that carry the parti gene but do not display the parti color, they are normal colored yorkis). They intend to deceive the public and show these parti carrier dogs in A.K.C. Shows as normal Yorkis. They then may gain access to better quality dogs to br

by Yorkie Yakker on 13 September 2010 - 19:09

Posts: 20
Joined: Mon Sep 13, 2010 06:41 pm
DISQUALIFICATION DIRECTIVE:
To: AKC Judges, AKC Judging Operations
From: The Yorkshire Terrier Club of America Board of Directors
Date: September 26, 2007
Subject: Clarification of the Yorkshire Terrier Disqualification to be initiated on Oct. 1, 2007.

The Disqualification reads as follows:
Any solid color or combination of colors other than blue and tan as described above.(in the Standard)
Any white markings other than a small white spot on the fore-chest that does not exceed 1 inch at its longest

dimension.

DIRECTIVE:
The new Disqualification is an ADDITION to the Yorkshire Terrier Breed Standard. It is there to Disqualify

Yorkshire Terriers with colors OTHER THAN those as described in our BREED STANDARD. The A.K.C.

is registering parti colors, solid colors and chocolate and tan dogs as Yorkshire Terriers even though they

do not meet our Breed Standard as written. A.K.C. will not deny registration on color alone. These dogs

have been shown at A.K.C. matches and non-A.K.C. events. Immature dogs not having totally clear tan or

immature dogs that are not yet totally blue are acceptable under our Breed Standard and

should NOT be Disqualified. To do so would be a mis-interpretation of the Disqualification AND of the Breed

Standard.

The Yorkshire Terrier whose coat is of prime importance has a slow metamorphosis from the black and tan

puppy to the blue and tan adult. Some of these dogs take three or more years for their coat to mature;

therefore our Y.T.C.A. members chose NOT to specify an age for colour maturity. Only dogs of solid color,

unusual combinations of colors and parti colors should be DISQUALIFIED.

IN SUMMARY:
Disqualify
* Solid color dogs such as a solid colour gold or solid color chocolate.(including Gold Dust Yorkies)
* A chocolate and tan dog or other unusual combinations of colors.
* A white dog with black and tan markings (parti or tri color).

Do Not Disqualify
* Puppies, Class dogs and young Champions whose tan has not yet totally cleared. This is typically seen

around the head area where thumb prints may exist. Young puppies may still have an intermingling of

black hair in the tan.
* Puppies and young adults whose black body coat has not yet totally turned to blue.
* A dog that has a small white spot not to exceed 1 inch on the fore-chest.
_____________________________________________________________________________

In a nutshell, breeding for one trait is irresponsible breeding!
Producing puppies only to fulfil a market is irresponsible breeding!
Breeding outside the breed standard is irresponsible breeding!
Shaping or changing the breed standard to "fit the dog" is unethical and irresponsible!
Purposely deceiving the public, dog fanciers, breeders and exhibitors in the name of clout,

bragging rights and monetary gain is unethical and irresponsible!


by Yorkie Yakker on 16 September 2010 - 10:09

Posts: 20
Joined: Mon Sep 13, 2010 06:41 pm
Here is what is wrong with the above statement by the President of the Parti Yorkshire Terrier Club, this club is not recognised by the parent club, the Yorkshire Terrier Club America as a breed club for the Yorkshire Terrier. Nikko's Rolls Royce Ashley did not win at Crufts in England.
The Streamglen Kennels in England were champion Yorkshire Terrier breeders, and their dogs won consistently at shows and Crufts, Streamglen Shaun was a Blue & Tan dog as was Streamglen Richard who won chapionship titles in Germany for Mr Biewer. They did not have Parti colored dogs. The United Kingdom as in Germany, Canada do not recognise the Parti Yorkshire as a pure bred. The American Kennel Club are a Regisrtry ONLY and have no breed knowledge of a dog, ANY dog.
Mr Biewers dogs did NOT just come from the Streamglen Kennels, he had German registered dogs also, and bred Shih-Tzu' also around the time of this White and Black dogs with a Yorkshire head, which became known as a Biewer a la Pom Pon. The German Kennel club would NOT register his dogs because they also did NOT believe they were a true pedigreed dog.
Breeders who continue to breed outside the standard such as the Parti Yorkshire Terrier, are breeding solely for the money, as the American Kennel Club take their registrations for their dogs, but the breed Club do not allow them to be shown. The Parti Yorkshire Terrier Club also have members who breed Biewers from Germany and Yorkshire and they breed the Biewer colors into their Parti dogs, and deceiptfully register them with the American Kennel Club. They are breeding the color of the Biewer into their parti dogs. A Yorkshire Terrier does not have a piebald gene, if they had this gene, the dogs would of been White from early years in the original country and be shown as such, the Yorkshire Terrier was first seen in Yorkshire England and comes from a Tan and Blue dog mating. They do not have any Parti (white dogs) Yorkshire Terriers in that Country. The person who states Tri from Joan Gordon book, is twisting the writers words, as a Tri is NOT a parti dog as seen today in America. A Tri was a color Black,Blue & Tan and NOT a White dog with Tan ears and a Black patch on its back, as these incorrectly cross bred Parti Yorkshire dogs are.
Buyer beware is correct, and unscrupulous breeders of the Parti Yorkshire are those breeders, do not pay any more for a Parti Yorkshire as they are NOT rare, they are a cross bred dog, which has managed to get onto an aleady corrupt registry the American Kennel Club.


by Yorkie Yakker on 16 September 2010 - 10:09

Posts: 20
Joined: Mon Sep 13, 2010 06:41 pm
RE: Parti colored yorkie - terbear86 - 07-04-2009 12:31 AM

Please no bashing! AKC does except these colors, BUT only with pics and DNA. So there are AKC papered colored Yorkies, and registered as what their color appears. I have done my research, and I do LOVE my breed! So again.. I am more than willing to share every thing I know, just don't bash.
I have Parti colored Yorkies, I like the brewers (sp) too, and have one of them as well, they are as said previously posted just two Yorkies in Germany that had the white genetics, and from there the color was bred in to the dog to get what Mr breiwer wanted as his "dream".

by Yorkie Yakker on 16 September 2010 - 10:09

Posts: 20
Joined: Mon Sep 13, 2010 06:41 pm
YTCA Parti-Color Yorkshire Terriers?

Do not be fooled into buying one of these dogs.
Now that Designer Dogs are the rage, the “new” Parti-Color Yorkie is certain to draw attention. While we have had problems in the past with “rare gold” Yorkshire Terriers being advertised, the parti-color is a new one! While some breeds have an occasional mismark and some breeds do have a gene for a white dog, we do not. Had there been a problem with white markings, piebald dogs, or white dogs, it would have been addressed in our Standard. Due to unscrupulous breeders advertising parti-colored Yorkshire Terriers at premium prices, our members voted unanimously at our annual meeting to add a disqualification for these and other off colored dogs.

The Yorkshire Terrier is a tan dog with a blue saddle. The “rare gold” Yorkie is actually a dog that appears as such due to an improper saddle pattern. Show breeders have seen this and commonly call it running gold. When the dog is cut down, you can see that the blue saddle does not come down far enough. The Yorkshire Terrier blue saddle extends lower than some of the other black and tan terriers extending to the elbow and also to the hock on the rear leg. Gold hairs can occur in the blue and black or blue hairs can appear in the gold. These faults are addressed in the Yorkshire Terrier Standard. These dogs have serious faults and they too should not be sold as "rare" but placed in loving homes as they are very incorrect. Yorkies do not have white markings…never have. A small white strip is sometimes seen on the chest of newborns but this always turns to tan within a few weeks. The AKC registration form for Yorkshire Terriers allows for four choices: blue and tan, blue and gold, black and tan, black and gold. There is no provision for markings.

A brief history of the development of the Yorkshire Terrier will show that the dog was developed in the 1800’s. In England, the Waterside Terrier was often crossed with the old English terrier, a silky coated black and tan or blue and tan terrier weighing around five pounds. When crafters from Scotland came into England, they brought several “Scotch“terriers, among them the Paisley and the Clydesdale. The Paisley was a small silky coated dog in various shades of blue. The Clydesdale was a blue and tan dog with the exact color pattern as the Yorkie of today. All of these original breeds were grizzle, tan, blue, blue and tan, or black and tan. No white dog or dogs with white markings were involved in the process of developing the breed. The first Yorkshire Terriers were entered at shows as Broken Haired Scotch and Yorkshire Terriers. In the early days, dog classes were often divided by size, under five pounds and over five pounds; however, there was never a class for colors other than the blue and tan we see today. The color pattern and coat texture has bred true and has been dominate enough that the Silky Terrier evolved by crossing the Yorkshire Terrier and the Australian Terrier with basically the same coat of the of the Yorkie.

by Yorkie Yakker on 16 September 2010 - 10:09

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Joined: Mon Sep 13, 2010 06:41 pm

by Yorkie Yakker on 16 September 2010 - 10:09

Posts: 20
Joined: Mon Sep 13, 2010 06:41 pm
The above picture is Mr Biewer holding a white and black eared shih tzu that he bred into his yorkshire's to get his colors of a white dog.

by Yorkie Yakker on 16 September 2010 - 11:09

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Joined: Mon Sep 13, 2010 06:41 pm
& KUVASZ STUD BOOK FRAUD
Existing Pedigree Fraud and Stud Book corruption made even worse by the American Kennel Club according the Kuvasz Case by breeder, Darla Lofranco. (link to Bulldog, Mastiff, Samoyed pedigree frauds at end of page)
You may not be interested in Kuvasz but you need to know how the AKC Stud Book, the bible of purebred dogs, is so easily and frequently wrong! One of North America’s top Kuvasz breeders says AKC’s most recent action affects the show ring as well as Kuvasz pedigrees in two countries. Her letter to the AKC attorney states:
“Lofranco TNT Trevor Nordland CKC UN653359 and Lofranco's Tank-You Nordland CKC UN641655 are littermates bred by Frank and Darla Lofranco in Canada. Trevor was ineligible for AKC registration as an import based on his CKC certificate UN653359 showing an address (Halton Hills, Ont) in Canada. When I pointed this out, AKC agreed there were no CKC export papers to support their records and therefore cancelled Trevor's illegal foreign registration in November 2005. But incredibly, AKC faxed a copy of the current records for WG195801 dated November 9, 2005 confirming that the dog imported by Karen and Henry Nichols of Nichols, WA was instead, the littermate Lofranco's Tank-You Nordland. I was not listed as the owner on AKC records dated November 9, 2005.

“In March I received a letter alleging that I had requested a name change from “Trevor” to “Tank” in November 2005 (which AKC granted) but the action was reversed. AKC said Tank's name was now changed to Trevor WG195801. I NEVER requested a name change in November 2005 or at any other time. Remember - I wasn't even listed as the owner of the dog in November 2005! And I could not request AKC to change the name of any dog born in Canada. AKC only has jurisdiction over a dog born in the USA. In addition, any name change MUST be in writing according to AKC rules. I am now listed as the owner of Trevor WG195801.

“As far as the Insurance claim I mentioned below, the Kuvasz Club of America Inc. and the AKC would not be covered if a dog caused harm to someone at a show if it was proven by the plaintiff that the dog should not have been there in the first place because it was illegally entered and illegally registered by the American Kennel Club. I think this could be a big problem for a lot of Clubs including the Kuvasz Club of America, Inc. AKC should give this more thought.

"Exhibitors are spending thousands of dollars each year showing against illegally registered Kuvasz entered at AKC events including Multi Best in Show, BISS Champion Szumeria's Wildwood Silver Six Pence WS271850/01. Tanner is a Multi Best In Show winner in the USA and will probably be at Westminster 2010.

“Another, illegally registered Kuvasz Best in Show Ch. Szumeria's Wildwood Penny From Heaven placed in the group at Westminster in 2007. Many kennels in the USA (and now Europe) have alleged descendants of Trevor/Tank WG195801 including Casablanca, Double Ring, Elso, Galaxy,Glacier Creek, Mattiaci, Nordland, Pandemont, Rebel Ridge,Shamont, Sweet Harvest, Szep Tars, Szumeria,Tepes Ridge, Wildwood, Tres Sage, Windridge and Yanilan.

Just think of all the money people are spending and handlers are losing to show against these dogs when they shouldn't even be in the ring! This would never happen in any other sport and should not be allowed at AKC events".

Darla Lofranco http://www.aztec-net.com/~lofrancokuvasz

“In November I sent the following letter to the American Kennel Club”

by Yorkie Yakker on 16 September 2010 - 11:09

Posts: 20
Joined: Mon Sep 13, 2010 06:41 pm
Darla Lofranco http://www.aztec-net.com/~lofrancokuvasz

“In November I sent the following letter to the American Kennel Club”

To: hrm@akc.org
Cc: jxc@akc.org ; mmd@akc.org ; 'KCA Directors' ; Darla Lofranco
Sent: Saturday, November 14, 2009 11:38 AM

Subject: AKC WG195801

Ms. Heather McManus - AKC Senior Attorney

CKC certificate of registration UN653359 confirms Lofranco TNT Trevor Nordland was ineligible for registration on foreign application WG195801 in accordance with the rules at the time. AKC must have a CKC export certificate showing an address in the USA to support Foreign Import application WG195801.

AKC alleges the address (Halton Hills, Ont) on CKC certificate UN653359 is within the USA which is incorrect. The address is Halton Hill, Ont. CANADA and not Halton Hills, Ont. USA. The application should have been rejected at the time for several reasons.

AKC records dated November 9, 2005 confirms the littermate Lofranco's Tank-You Nordland was imported by Karen and Henry Nichols. Finally, after several requests, AKC cancelled Trevor's illegal registration in November 2005 and then re-instated the dog as per letter dated March 3, 2006.

The AKC letter dated March 3, 2006 alleging Trevor and Tank were the same dog is absurd. The same ridiculous letter was published by the Kuvasz Club of America, Inc. The identity and pedigree is also questioned based on two different littermates (Trevor/Tank) listed as the sire of Nordland's Rocky on AKC certified pedigrees.

Exhibitors are spending thousands of dollars each year showing against illegally registered dogs entered at AKC events including Szumeria's Wildwood Silver Six Pence WS271850/01 who is an alleged descendant of WG195801. This would never happen in any other sport and should not be allowed at AKC events.

AKC and the Kuvasz Club of America, Inc. could also be liable should an Insurance claim be filed at an AKC event especially when the breeder/owner has provided both Clubs with a copy of AKC records confirming the dog was ineligible for registration in accordance with the rules at the time.

The breeder/owner is requesting AKC uphold the decision to cancel Trevor's registration in November 2005.

Please give this serious matter your immediate attention and advise accordingly.

Respectfully Submitted,
Darla Lofranco
Breeder/Canadian Owner WG195801

cc: Mr. Dennis Sprung - AKC President
Mr. James Crowley - AKC Secretary
Kuvasz Club of America, Inc.

Editor’s Note; Complete coverage of this extraordinary story begins in "Pedigree Fraud” which also provides details on Mastiff, Samoyed, and Bulldog Stud Book corruption

by Yorkie Yakker on 17 September 2010 - 13:09

Posts: 20
Joined: Mon Sep 13, 2010 06:41 pm
Sunday, December 31, 1995top
The Philadelphia Inquirer


Kennel club certifications are often worthless, ex-employees say.
Money may be why:
Enforcement of rules would slow the flow.
Digging into the AKC: Taking cash for tainted dogs
By Karl Stark
INQUIRER STAFF WRITER


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

©1995 The Philadelphia Inquirer
David Bartscher and Robert O. Baker can't forget the dead dogs they pulled out of Shirley Myers' kennel.
The humane officers had traveled to the prairie town of Mitchell, S.D., to raid the kennel with Davison County Sheriff Lyle Swenson. They found three dead rottweiler puppies stuffed in trash bags of excrement. Three other puppies were sick, apparently with the deadly parvovirus. Nursing mothers were living in cages without water.
Many of the 150 dogs lived in virtual darkness, while others splashed around in mud tainted with their own excrement. Two small dogs had lost their paws to a male rottweiler who bit them off, Myers acknowledged. The officers captured the entire raid, including Myers' comments, on videotape.
That they found deplorable conditions at a ``puppy mill'' was not a surprise. That the Myers kennel dogs had the sanction of the highly respected American Kennel Club (AKC) is another matter.
Myers was a breeder whose dogs had long been accepted for purebred registration by the AKC. AKC officials had known for several years that Myers was failing to keep proper records to prove that her dogs were purebred, AKC reports show. AKC delayed taking strong action even after its own staff uncovered evidence of unidentified dogs and sloppy book work, former AKC inspectors said.
In an Inquirer investigation, six former AKC inspectors said in lengthy interviews that the dog registry of the American Kennel Club, a nonprofit organization widely regarded as the guarantor of the pedigrees of purebred dogs, is largely a sham. They say, and records show, that the club does little or nothing to ensure that many of the dogs the club certifies as purebred are legitimately bred.
In the last five years, the AKC has taken in more than $100 million in exchange for papers certifying more than six million dogs as purebreds. Much of that money came from large kennels that sell dogs to brokers or to pet stores. The former AKC inspectors say those certifications are often worthless or untrue.
The inspectors say the AKC does not verify bloodlines. What it does is accept applications and fees and send out registration papers, relying mostly on the word of the breeder that the information submitted is true.
They say the club's primary enterprise -- the registry of purebred dogs -- has been corrupted. So many dogs without proper papers and proven lineage have been accepted into the AKC ``stud book,'' or registry, in recent years that it's no longer reliable, they say.

by Yorkie Yakker on 17 September 2010 - 13:09

Posts: 20
Joined: Mon Sep 13, 2010 06:41 pm
say.
In many cases, they say, the AKC knows the registrations are suspect but approves them anyway for a fee. The AKC has never undertaken a thorough study of its stud book.
AKC officials say the club's main duty is to serve as a registry, not as a police organization. The AKC has 15 inspectors for the entire nation.
Here are comments from six former AKC inspectors:
Robert Nejdl, widely considered the dean of AKC investigations, became the club's first investigator in 1973 and retired in 1994. Said Nejdl: ``When people buy an AKC dog, they expect it to be of high quality and they expect the papers to truly match the dog. But that's not often true. It's just so much window dressing. The American Kennel Club is in the registration business and not the deregistration business. It's the cash cow.''
Robert E. Hufford, a former AKC manager of field agents who worked for the club from 1986 to 1994, said: ``It's a shame. In my opinion, the only thing it [ the AKC ] is, is a moneymaking operation. A friend of mine hit it on the head: `The only difference between the AKC and counterfeiters is the color of money.' They sell something that they're never going to run out of, and it doesn't cost them anything. The AKC is shipping out registration papers daily they knew should have been canceled out. The bottom line is the AKC, they don't give a damn [ about conditions ] as long as the checks don't bounce.''
Rona Farley, a former AKC inspector based in Pennsylvania from 1991 to 1995, estimated in a court affidavit that in her four years on the job, 90 percent of the breeders she inspected failed to meet AKC record-keeping requirements. ``An infinitesimal percentage of those noncomplying subjects were, to my knowledge, ever disciplined, sanctioned or suspended.'' When breeders failed to comply with AKC rules, Farley said, she was instructed to ``assist the subject of inspection in re-creating records.''
Sharon D. Reed, an AKC investigator who covered Pennsylvania and New Jersey from 1986 to 1991, said: ``AKC management fought me tooth and nail about what cases should be prosecuted and mostly on what dogs [ papers ] should be canceled. They never wanted dogs canceled, even when I had shown fraud. They said they didn't want to harm the poor consumer. My answer was `The harm has been done. You are augmenting the harm.' Boy, did that get me screamed at. AKC registration is worthless.''
Mike Reilly, an AKC inspector in California from 1985 to 1994, said: ``They didn't want to know anything that would upset the applecart. They wanted everything to run smoothly, get the registration money, don't make waves. The bottom line is get the money.''

by Yorkie Yakker on 17 September 2010 - 13:09

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Joined: Mon Sep 13, 2010 06:41 pm
Martie W. King, a former AKC investigator from 1986 to 1990 who covered Pennsylvania, said: ``The name of the game is don't cancel [ purebred certificates ] . If they take too many dogs out, they might have to refund money. . . . That's going to affect their revenue.''
None of the current AKC inspectors who were contacted wished to comment. The AKC has a policy barring employees from speaking to reporters without permission.
AKC President Judith V. Daniels said in an interview that the club's investigations unit was ``pretty good'' and improving all the time. She said that puppy mills represent ``a difficult situation'' for the AKC and that she lacks the authority to toughen enforcement. ``It's up to the entire [ club membership ] to determine how we want to deal with this issue.''
Daniels said part of the problem was that the organization, which has 12 board members, is split on what its mission should be. Some, like board chairman Robert Berndt, want to focus on traditional AKC activities, such as dog shows. They say the former inspectors were disgruntled employees. They argue that the AKC is not in the business of policing conditions at dog kennels and, therefore, should not be held accountable for puppy mills.
"'It's not that we're not interested in puppy mills,'' Berndt said in an interview. ``We don't encourage them. We're interested in the sport breeder, the person who breeds for the betterment of purebred dogs.''
Others on the board say the former AKC inspectors are not disgruntled but genuinely want to help dogs. These board members say the AKC should be more active in detecting improper registrations of dogs because more than 80 percent of the AKC's income comes from registration fees, much of that from puppy mills.
"'Yes, we are a registry, but the AKC is more than that,'' said board member Kenneth A. Marden of Titusville, N.J., a former AKC president. ``When you're as big as the AKC, you do have a responsibility to purebred dogs.''
The AKC was formed by wealthy dog owners in Philadelphia in 1884. They were men interested in creating standards for purebred dogs and sponsoring dog shows.
The AKC says it is the nation's second-oldest sports organization. Only the U.S. Tennis Association is older. Women weren't allowed to become AKC delegates and vote for the board of directors until 1974.
Today the club has headquarters on Madison Avenue costing $971,000 a year to rent, a sprawling registration-processing center in Raleigh, N.C., and a lobbyist in Washington. The AKC plans to develop part of its North Carolina property into a hotel. The club's president was paid $177,000 in 1993, according to the most recently available federal tax documents.
According to AKC rules, all dog breeders must keep strict records detailing their animals' lineage. If the chain of proof is broken at any point, the dogs can be canceled from the registry.

by Yorkie Yakker on 17 September 2010 - 13:09

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Joined: Mon Sep 13, 2010 06:41 pm
Those rules serve to give AKC dogs cache. An AKC-certified dog can be sold for $100 to $300 more than a dog without papers. Purebreds are more valuable, because their parents are all the same breed and their features conform to a recognized standard.
A puppy mill that loses AKC privileges is in trouble. ``They can't sell dogs without registration papers,'' AKC Chairman Berndt said. ``Nobody will buy them.''
Even many within the AKC say the old rules need to be updated.
" We're overwhelmed by counterfeit AKC dogs,'' said Nina Schaefer of Huntingdon Valley, one of 484 AKC delegates who elect the AKC board. ``Registration procedures were established over a hundred years ago by people who thought they were creating a purebred dog registry. . . . This system is not working in the market-driven world of today, and it is time to change.''
Records show that the AKC rarely uses its authority to strike dogs from the registry. The club registered 1.3 million dogs in 1994 and declined to register 1,331 dogs -- about a 10th of 1 percent.
"'The AKC really holds the power, much more than federal and state agencies, to shut down puppy mills,'' said Melanie Volk, former president of the Badger Kennel Club, an AKC member club in Wisconsin. ``Those puppy mills wouldn't make a dime on the puppy if they couldn't put the `AKC' on their dogs.''
AKC board member James G. Phinizy said he had experienced firsthand the ineffectiveness of the AKC investigations unit. In a 1989 letter to the AKC board chairman, Phinizy wrote that he and fellow enthusiasts of the Scottish deerhound breed had been ``put off, stonewalled and lied to'' over a complaint they had made to the AKC.
"'The investigations department, as it exists, is ineffective and is unable to resolve a complaint, even when given the basic materials with which to work,'' Phinizy wrote in 1989.
After he joined the board in 1992, Phinizy wrote another letter to the board chairman in which he reiterated: ``The inspections/investigations unit is not being managed at all effectively.''
In a recent interview, Phinizy said some improvements had been made, although he acknowledged that problems still plague the registry. He said the former inspectors critical of the stud book were not disgruntled employees. ``There are an awful lot of good people who are trying to improve the AKC,'' he said.

by Yorkie Yakker on 17 September 2010 - 14:09

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Joined: Mon Sep 13, 2010 06:41 pm
On July 4, 1993, Melanie Volk went digging for dead dogs.
Volk, the president of a dog club affiliated with the AKC, stood in a pair of flip-flops on the muddy property of a well-known dog breeder in Wisconsin and poked her pitchfork into a moist mound of earth behind the barn. Up came skulls and bones of rottweilers and poodles, the rotting fur of Samoyeds and Akitas.
A few hours of spade work yielded Volk and her associates 15 skulls and 19 dog tags. The group videotaped their dig and sent a tape to AKC headquarters in New York.
The AKC had been receiving complaints about the Wisconsin kennel since 1988 and took no action while continuing to accept fees to certify the kennel's dogs as purebred.
The 83-acre farm Volk was investigating was then owned by dog breeder Claudia Haugh in Hillsboro, Wisc. As president of the Badger Kennel Club in Madison, Volk had collected dozens of complaints about Haugh selling sick dogs.
Volk also talked to four former employees who told her about the Haugh kennel's lack of veterinary care and casual filing of AKC records. And she and others had sent letters and packages to the AKC to get the club to investigate how such a kennel could be selling purebred dogs. Volk said she knew of at least a dozen other people who complained about Haugh to the AKC.
Among those who complained was Rose Bednarski of Milwaukee, who helped Haugh start breeding Ibizan hounds in the mid-1980s. Bednarski said she saw what she considered to be Haugh's poor methods and record-keeping and reported them to the AKC, starting in 1988.
Paul R. Firling, the AKC director of investigations at the time, promised Bednarski in a March 11, 1991, letter that the matter would be referred to a field agent.
Nothing came of Firling's promise, according to Bednarski and former inspector Robert Nejdl.
Jon and Mary Kuemmerlein of Madison paid Haugh $200 for what they thought was a purebred Irish setter in 1991. The dog, which was returned three weeks later because of numerous illnesses, was sold with AKC papers as a purebred. Mary Kuemmerlein realized that the puppy was the wrong color -- it was blond instead of mahogany -- and didn't look like a purebred.
AKC officials ``just simply couldn't care less,'' she said. ``They got so they wouldn't even return my calls. We sent letters. We called. We just inundated them. They simply didn't want to hear about it.
"'They were getting money out of registration from the dogs [ Haugh ] sold.''
Registration fees are $8 a dog, and $32 for a certified pedigree, which documents four generations of a dog's lineage and its parents' colors.
AKC inspector Nejdl also wrote reports about the Haugh kennel.
In July 1992, Nejdl reported to AKC headquarters that Haugh had recruited people to sell her dogs near Milwaukee, Madison and La Crosse. Nejdl said he believed that this multilevel marketing network violated AKC rules.
"'In the best of circumstances, it would have been a record-keeping nightmare for Haugh to stay in compliance'' with AKC rules, Nejdl said.

by Yorkie Yakker on 17 September 2010 - 14:09

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Joined: Mon Sep 13, 2010 06:41 pm
Nejdl said.
The AKC took no action, Nejdl said.
More information was reaching Nejdl from former Haugh employees who claimed that Haugh wasn't keeping records properly. Joan Nygaard, who sold dogs for Haugh, said she recalled that dogs' papers sometimes wouldn't match the dogs she sold. "She was just sending out any papers she wanted,'' Nygaard said.
In April 1993, Nejdl made another report to his AKC superiors and noted that Wisconsin agriculture officials had raided Haugh's kennel in November 1992. Haugh pleaded no contest in April 1993 to charges of poor ventilation at her kennel.
"It is only a matter of time before the humane societies/press see a story,'' Nejdl told his bosses.
The AKC still took no action, Nejdl said.
"'They didn't have the will to fully investigate Claudia Haugh,'' Nejdl said. ''They didn't have the will to fully investigate anyone.''
Nejdl wasn't the only AKC official who heard about problems at the Wisconsin kennel.
Volk was regularly sending letters to high AKC officials, including board member Judith V. Daniels, now AKC's president.
Nothing seemed to make the AKC move, Volk said, so she befriended Roger Haugh, Claudia's former husband, and got him to let Volk and some friends onto the Haughs' property while she was away.
Using tips from former kennel employees, Volk went straight to an eight-foot mound and began digging. The video they made was leaked to a local TV station. Claudia Haugh said in an interview that the bad publicity was one reason she left the dog business.
After receiving the video, the AKC board voted on Sept. 14, 1993, to suspend Haugh's privileges.
But the AKC's action against Haugh had no practical effect, Nejdl said, because she had already gone out of business. No dogs were canceled from the stud book, he said. ``They don't even know which dogs are dead in that pile,'' Nejdl said. ''Anything that passed through her hands is blighted.''
In an interview, Haugh said she had no problem with the AKC until after her divorce began. ``They do cut you off,'' she said of the AKC. ``They're very severe about that.''
Haugh said that she had never seen the videotape but believed that it might have been altered.
Haugh also denied that she sold poor dogs. ''They weren't hamburger,'' she said. ''They all had champion bloodlines.''
On Sept. 16, 1990, inspectors Nejdl and Peter Haerle inspected the kennel of Donna and Dale Huffman in Willow Springs, Mo.
Over the next week, the AKC investigators obtained written statements from former employees saying that the Huffmans regularly flouted AKC rules at their 500-dog kennel.

by Yorkie Yakker on 17 September 2010 - 14:09

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Joined: Mon Sep 13, 2010 06:41 pm
The Huffmans supplied dogs to 18 Docktor Pet Center stores, mostly in the South. When the dogs were sold, the AKC hadn't yet certified them as purebred.
Scores of customers who bought Huffman-bred dogs in early 1991 couldn't get AKC papers because of the hold on the Huffmans.
Many complained to the AKC. Robert L. Gryder, who ran a Docktor Pet Center in Biloxi, Miss., wrote to the AKC in May 1991, asking that the club quickly issue purebred papers or cause "irreparable harm to our business."
About a year after the suspension of the Huffmans, the AKC agreed to register the dogs she had sold in return for her promise to stay out of dog breeding for the rest of her life, Donna Huffman said.
Nejdl said the compromise hurt the AKC registry: There are now nearly 4,500 dogs that the registry knows to be improperly bred. "The AKC holds themselves out to be a pristine registry that basically is the very best," he said. "The only way you can have the very best is to enforce your own rules."
Dotsie Keith and Nina Schaefer don't consider themselves animal-rights activists. Keith is legislative chairwoman of the Pennsylvania Federation of Dog Clubs. Schaefer recently concluded eight years as federation president. She and her husband, Charles, are both AKC delegates.
In December 1993, Keith and Schaefer traveled to New York City to ask the AKC to do more about puppy mills in Pennsylvania. Specifically, they wanted the AKC to investigate Joyce Stoltzfus, a suspended Lancaster County breeder, who they said was still using AKC privileges by having her husband use his name on the papers.
Keith and Schaefer said they admired a copy of a painting by Queen Victoria's painter, Edwin Landseer, who painted dogs and other animals, in the AKC lobby. They were treated to corned-beef lunches in the AKC's boardroom with Robert G. Maxwell, the AKC president at the time.
Nothing changed after their visit, the two women say. The Lancaster breeder is still bypassing AKC rules, according to a review of recent sales complaints against the kennel.
"I don't think they recognize how AKC registration papers are making dogs an attractive product for puppy mills in Pennsylvania," Schaefer said.
Said Keith: "It's not a secret that they haven't done anything about puppy mills. . . . We all know there needs to be vast improvement in the administration of the AKC."
Both women say the majority of dog enthusiasts support some kind of AKC action on puppy mills. Several surveys of AKC delegates and show people have identified the registry and puppy mills as the most important issues facing the club.
Keith and Schaefer had hoped to interest the organization in using DNA testing to make a detailed study of dogs of any large commercial breeder in Lancaster County. They had hoped the study would show whether the breeder was truly meeting AKC requirements

by Yorkie Yakker on 17 September 2010 - 14:09

Posts: 20
Joined: Mon Sep 13, 2010 06:41 pm
The AKC didn't do it, they said.
The two women also brought up Joyce Stoltzfus' Puppy Love Kennels in Lancaster County. The AKC had suspended her after investigator Sharon D. Reed inspected the kennel on June 13, 1990. Among Reed's findings: Stoltzfus' personal records listed 12 breedings by a Labrador retriever named Sander Bleu, while Stoltzfus told the AKC the same dog had sired 50 litters.
Despite her suspension, Stoltzfus continued to sell AKC-registered dogs, Keith and Schaefer say.
Stoltzfus declined to comment. Her husband, Ray, could not be reached.
Recent sales complaints reviewed by The Inquirer show that Joyce Stoltzfus has continued to sell AKC-registered dogs. The complaints were obtained from the Pennsylvania SPCA, which lists Puppy Love as one of the state's three largest sources of consumer complaints.
When asked about Puppy Love, AKC spokesman Wayne R. Cavanaugh said the AKC couldn't blame Ray Stoltzfus for his wife's errors. He said the AKC was ``very interested" in claims that the Stoltzfuses were circumventing her suspension. "If you know of a buyer that could substantiate this claim, please let us know so that we can take the appropriate action," Cavanaugh said.
Former inspector Mike Reilly said AKC officials in New York made it difficult for him to do his job.
For months, Reilly had asked his superiors to send records of all dogs filed with the AKC by breeders Fred and Marge Bauer of Miami, Okla. The AKC had suspended Marge Bauer in 1988, and Reilly suspected that many of her 100-plus dogs wouldn't match their AKC records.
On Feb. 2, 1993, Reilly conducted an inspection. "Everything they brought me had errors on it," he said.
The couple admitted in signed statements that they had failed to keep proper records, Reilly said. Reilly also found that Marge, despite her suspension, had continued to sell AKC dogs by registering them in her husband's name.
Fred Bauer was suspended by the AKC on May 11, 1993.
The business proved difficult without AKC backing, Marge Bauer said. She said she appealed to the club for reinstatement because she wanted to start raising rottweilers.
The club reinstated her on Sept. 14, 1994. AKC inspectors haven't visited her since, she said.
"I just wrote them a letter and asked them if I could have privileges back," Marge Bauer said. "I was surprised I got it really."
David Bartscher, an officer with the Sioux Falls Humane Society, first inspected Shirley Myers' kennel in South Dakota on April 16, 1990, and said he found deplorable conditions. Dogs had matted coats that he believed never had been shaved down. Filth and stench were everywhere.

by Yorkie Yakker on 17 September 2010 - 14:09

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Joined: Mon Sep 13, 2010 06:41 pm
Bartscher repeatedly tried to get Myers to clean up her kennel. Myers made little progress, he said. "It was like she's from a different time where she just felt she was doing everything she needed to do," he said.
Bartscher called in Robert O. Baker, then chief investigator of the Humane Society of the United States. The two men and Sheriff Swenson conducted a videotaped search of Myers' kennel on May 12, 1992.
The tape showed that up to three inches of feces had accumulated under some cages. Only the nursing puppies and their mothers had food, the officers found. Myers had run out of food for the others, according to the officers' reports.
AKC dogs are often viewed as exemplars of their breeds. Myers' purebreds had large sores on their bodies, the officers found. Many had potbellies from parasites and malnutrition. Others had genetic defects, such as entropion eyes, a condition in which the eyelid grows toward the eye and causes irritation and blindness.
By chance, two AKC employees, manager Robert E. Hufford and inspector Eugene G. Brennan, were in South Dakota that day to brief breeders on AKC rules. They heard about the raid from humane officers staying at the same hotel, and they stopped by Myers' kennel two days after the raid. They found Myers in violation of AKC rules.
Hufford said that Myers' dogs weren't identified and that her records were in such disarray that they made no sense.
Hufford said he soon placed Myers on hold, meaning that new dog registrations from the kennel wouldn't be approved until Myers could clearly identify her dogs and document their lineage.
When Myers refused to allow a reinspection, Hufford said, he recommended that the AKC permanently suspend her.
The AKC didn't. Another AKC manager was sent from New York to reinspect Myers' kennel on Feb. 29, 1993. He reapproved the kennel, an AKC spokesman said.
Myers' kennel was once again able to sell dogs, with the AKC's backing.
The action infuriated Darla Brobjorg, the president of the Sioux Empire Kennel Club, an AKC member group in South Dakota. She said she concluded from the Myers case and others that AKC enforcement is virtually meaningless.
The AKC typically suspends only small breeders, not big kennels, to protect their registration income, she said. "They're in this to make money," Brobjorg said.
On June 6, 1993, an inspector for the U.S. Department of Agriculture wrote a report on Myers' kennel, noting that her dogs weren't identified. The department's identification requirements are considered less strict than the AKC's.
Myers was arrested on animal cruelty charges on Aug. 18, 1993. She was convicted of one count of cruelty on April 19, 1994, and ordered out of the dog business. The AKC continued to accept her registrations after she appealed.
Once Myers was convicted, many thought the AKC would act, because the club has a policy of banning breeders convicted of cruelty. The club didn't act quickly.
AKC inspector Nejdl was asked to perform another inspection, which he did on July 17, 1994. He got Myers to sign a statement admitting that her records were "not in any kind of order."
Still, the AKC delayed taking action. Nejdl said he believes another AKC inspector was sent out to confirm his report.
When the AKC finally suspended Myers on Dec. 12, 1994, for poor record-keeping, the five-year suspension had little practical value. The AKC ruled that people who bought dogs from Myers could get their dogs registered, in some cases, under the AKC's "unofficial hardship" clause. Dog buyers had only to say that they didn't know of the breeder's suspension when they bought the dog. AKC board member Phinizy said he helped institute a new policy last summer to make it more difficult to register a dog under the hardship clause.

by Yorkie Yakker on 17 September 2010 - 14:09

Posts: 20
Joined: Mon Sep 13, 2010 06:41 pm
Myers' kennel was once again able to sell dogs, with the AKC's backing.
The action infuriated Darla Brobjorg, the president of the Sioux Empire Kennel Club, an AKC member group in South Dakota. She said she concluded from the Myers case and others that AKC enforcement is virtually meaningless.
The AKC typically suspends only small breeders, not big kennels, to protect their registration income, she said. "They're in this to make money," Brobjorg said.
On June 6, 1993, an inspector for the U.S. Department of Agriculture wrote a report on Myers' kennel, noting that her dogs weren't identified. The department's identification requirements are considered less strict than the AKC's.
Myers was arrested on animal cruelty charges on Aug. 18, 1993. She was convicted of one count of cruelty on April 19, 1994, and ordered out of the dog business. The AKC continued to accept her registrations after she appealed.
Once Myers was convicted, many thought the AKC would act, because the club has a policy of banning breeders convicted of cruelty. The club didn't act quickly.
AKC inspector Nejdl was asked to perform another inspection, which he did on July 17, 1994. He got Myers to sign a statement admitting that her records were "not in any kind of order."
Still, the AKC delayed taking action. Nejdl said he believes another AKC inspector was sent out to confirm his report.
When the AKC finally suspended Myers on Dec. 12, 1994, for poor record-keeping, the five-year suspension had little practical value. The AKC ruled that people who bought dogs from Myers could get their dogs registered, in some cases, under the AKC's "unofficial hardship" clause. Dog buyers had only to say that they didn't know of the breeder's suspension when they bought the dog. AKC board member Phinizy said he helped institute a new policy last summer to make it more difficult to register a dog under the hardship clause.
The AKC also declined to conduct a full investigation and to remove dogs from its stud book that Myers had previously registered, former inspectors say.
Myers declined to talk about the AKC's handling of her case.
An AKC spokesman said Myers was given an additional 10 years of suspension in February for her conviction of cruelty.
Baker, the humane officer, said he wasn't surprised by the AKC's delays. After officers seized 11 of Myers' dogs in May 1992, many people made contributions to help the dogs, including prisoners at the nearby South Dakota State Penitentiary in Sioux Falls.
"It's a shame when the inmates in a state penitentiary have more compassion and care for animals than the American Kennel Club," Baker said.


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