Shop pet related items

German Shepherd Dog > Military dogs: GSD vs. Belg Mal vs. Dutch Shep (85 replies)

by duke1965 on 28 July 2013 - 06:07

Posts: 1395
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 06:04 pm
price and availability are big factor, most police and army trainers I know will tell you the best dog for any detection job is a GSD, but they annot get them, again price/availability, sport and private people drive up the price for good GSD

second point for all the showline haters to think about is  that we basically have three lines now in GSD, the showlines, the sportlines and the workinglines that are capable of filling various positions

next thing to think about is that the military and police are taking more and more happy social balldrive dogs so this is where the sporty dogs can fit in again LOL

its an ever changing world

by morningstar on 28 July 2013 - 12:07

Posts: 5
Joined: Sun Jul 28, 2013 12:34 pm
Someone here said Dutch shepherds and Malinois are 'the same breed really' and seeing that I'm Dutch I can say for certain they're not. The Malinois is a Belgian breed, more closely related to the Tervueren, Groenendael and Laekenois than it is to the Dutch shepherd, a breed that hails from the Netherlands. These are FCI registered breeds and are NOT the same thing. 

There are however the KNPV lines, those aren't purebred dogs but mixes of mostly Malinois, Dutchies and GSD, bred solely for working qualities. To my understanding they are classified as 'Dutch shepherd' or 'Malinois' according to the way they turn out; if they're brindled they're called a Dutch shepherd and if they're fawn with black mask they're called Malinois. I suppose if you're talking about these dogs than you CAN say they're basically 'the same thing'. 

To the OP: I think Dutch shepherds, Malinois and the KNPV working bred dogs are preferred over GSDs because they're physically smaller, lighter, quicker, more agile, and mentally they're sharper and more intense. Not saying GSDs can't make great working dogs, because they can. But I can see why for military purposes other dogs are preferred. 

by Baerenfangs Erbe on 28 July 2013 - 13:07

Posts: 145
Joined: Thu Jul 04, 2013 11:01 pm
There are however the KNPV lines, those aren't purebred dogs but mixes of mostly Malinois, Dutchies and GSD, bred solely for working qualities. To my understanding they are classified as 'Dutch shepherd' or 'Malinois' according to the way they turn out; if they're brindled they're called a Dutch shepherd and if they're fawn with black mask they're called Malinois. I suppose if you're talking about these dogs than you CAN say they're basically 'the same thing'. 

To the OP: I think Dutch shepherds, Malinois and the KNPV working bred dogs are preferred over GSDs because they're physically smaller, lighter, quicker, more agile, and mentally they're sharper and more intense. Not saying GSDs can't make great working dogs, because they can. But I can see why for military purposes other dogs are preferred. 



Isn't that the X Mechelaar?

by morningstar on 28 July 2013 - 13:07

Posts: 5
Joined: Sun Jul 28, 2013 12:34 pm
Isn't that the X Mechelaar?

Yes, that's right. Either that, or X Hollander/X Hollandse herder, X Duitse herder. (to my knowledge) The X indicating they're crosses. 

by Hired Dog on 28 July 2013 - 14:07

Posts: 723
Joined: Wed Feb 09, 2011 04:46 pm
Morningstar, since those KNPV, non FCI registered dogs are the only ones I have ever had any interest in and since we are talking about strictly working military dogs, that is what I was talking about.
You are correct, it comes out stripped, its a Dutch Shepherd, it comes out red or fawn, its a Malinois.

by jemi on 28 July 2013 - 20:07

Posts: 97
Joined: Sat Apr 28, 2012 02:37 pm
I f you trace back the Malinois lineage, one of the earliest progenitor "Samlo" was a brindle dog, striped like a dutch shepherd......

http://www.working-dog.eu/dogs-details/7878/Cora-II-LOSH-6470

by morningstar on 29 July 2013 - 06:07

Posts: 5
Joined: Sun Jul 28, 2013 12:34 pm
Back in those days I do not believe appearance mattered much, as long as the dog could do what it was bred to do. Therefore I think it's very likely that Malinois also came in brindle and Dutch shepherds also came in solid. 

In later times breed standards were created and people decided Dutch shepherds should be brindled (except for the rough hair, those also come in pepper-and-salt or blue-grey) though as it is, sometimes they're still born solid colored. (though that may also be because after WWII dogs of unknown origin and some Malinois were used for a short while to expand the gene pool seeing that the breed faced extinction) 

Originally there were more varieties of Belgian shepherds too, but it was decided only four varieties were standardized and in the end, only they remained. Those four are what we now know as the black longhaired Groenendael, the rough coated Laekenois, the red/fawn shorthaired Malinois and the red/fawn longhaired Tervueren. These four are closely related, for example: both long and shorthaired pups can appear in one litter (Malinois & Tervueren) and both red/fawn and black pups can appear in a longhaired litter (Tervueren & Groenendael). 

by kishorem19 on 29 July 2013 - 06:07

Posts: 28
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2013 12:03 am
I know looks may not matter in this Topic... but I like the GSD way better than the other two discussed here.

kishore

You must be logged in to reply to posts










Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!