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Main > when to spay german shepherd (27 replies)

by margarita on 15 October 2008 - 14:10

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 My gsd is almost 6 months old.  We do not plan to breed her.  What is an appropriate age to spay her?  I've heard wait until after her 1st heat.  Any thoughts?

by Langhaar on 15 October 2008 - 14:10

Posts: 345
Joined: Wed Aug 22, 2007 12:56 pm

Personally I would not spay a bitch prior to maturity, sex hormones govern more the fertility.

 

 

 

http://www.caninesports.com/SpayNeuter.html http://www.naiaonline.org/pdfs/LongTermHealthEffectsOfSpayNeuterInDogs.pdf

 

by snajper69 on 15 October 2008 - 14:10

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Joined: Tue Jun 17, 2008 02:31 am

I would never fix(brake) any dog.

 

But bitch I would concider at 5-7 years old, or no sooner then full maturity.

Male never!

by beepy on 15 October 2008 - 15:10

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Often spaying is the safest way to ensure that a bitch doesnt get caught.  I've known bitches to literally chew their way out of places to get to a male.

I have found that if bitches have 2 season - with the first being after 6 months and then the 2nd 6months later, is usually ok.  Its amazing to watch them change/mature with each season.  If you can afford to wait until they are 2 years old then do, however I have had no bad experiences with the 2 season rule.  Also make sure the bitch is in the middle of her cycle when you spay her, as you halt her in what ever stage she is at, and you dont want her post or pre season when the op is done.

by tigermouse on 15 October 2008 - 15:10

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I personally wouldn't spay a bitch until 2 years old preferably 3

bitches need time to mature physically and emotionally

by susanandthek9s on 15 October 2008 - 15:10

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If a bitch goes through one heat, her chance of breast cancer increases from almost zero to about 8%. If she goes through two heats, her chance of breast cancer shoots up to about one in four. As you can imagine, breast cancer in a dog can be a nightmare. Sometimes the entire mammary chain on both sides has to be surgically removed. This requires multiple surgeries--there isn't enough skin to stretch across to do it with one surgery. All of this is hell on the dog and horribly expensive. And you can still lose the dog. This is why vets like to spay when the bitch is about six months old, before the first heat.

by missbeeb on 15 October 2008 - 15:10

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Joined: Wed Jul 23, 2008 02:46 pm

There would have to be some REAL medical problem before I would spay any bitch under 2yrs of age and 6 months is totally unacceptable in my book!

by snajper69 on 15 October 2008 - 15:10

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Joined: Tue Jun 17, 2008 02:31 am

Susan, let me ask you a question what dose breast cencer has to do with fixing? hmmm can I see some medical research that makes this claim?

by tigermouse on 15 October 2008 - 15:10

Posts: 1763
Joined: Sun Feb 10, 2008 07:53 pm

personally I have never seen or herd of any proof to this claim and i honestly think that its a common misconception amongst vets. or a ploy to get more cash if this were true one in 4 of my girl would get cancer mmmmmmm no LOL        silly myth

our old JRT got breast cancer and she was done at 6 months old  (i was a kid at the time) and i have seen first hand the emotional damage done to gsd bitches spayed too early.

best to just wait until 2-3 years and keep a close eye on her when she is around male dogs.

 

 

by triodegirl on 15 October 2008 - 16:10

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Joined: Thu Apr 13, 2006 10:51 pm

When I had Bella at the vet several months ago she recommended I spay her at 16 wks. I'm not sure I will spay her at all, but if I did, 16 wks seemed way too young. I was told the longer I waited, the more difficult the surgery would be for her. True? I thought the new laser surgery allows the female to go home the same day.

by Langhaar on 15 October 2008 - 16:10

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Joined: Wed Aug 22, 2007 12:56 pm

Extract from the previous link on the long term effects of neutering.  The figures and stats in this do not mirror those printed above...............

Mammary Cancer (Breast Cancer)

Mammary tumors are by far the most common tumors in intact female dogs, constituting some 53% of all

malignant tumors in female dogs in a study of dogs in Norway

15 where spaying is much less common than in16. Mammary17, and the published research18 shows that the



29 months 0.06

 

Intact 1.00

Please note that these are RELATIVE risks. This study has been referenced elsewhere many times but the

results have often been misrepresented as absolute risks.

A similar reduction in breast cancer risk was found for women under the age of 40 who lost their estrogen

production due to “artificial menopause”

Mammary cancer was found to be the 10

even though 86% of female GRs were spayed, at a median age of 3.4 yrs

subset accounts for almost all mammary cancer cases, it probably would rank at about the 5

cause of years of lost life in female GRs. It would rank higher still if more female GRs had been kept intact

up to 30 months of age.

Boxers, cocker spaniels, English Springer spaniels, and dachshunds are breeds at high risk of mammary

tumors

mammary cancer between the ages of 6-12 years of age

may be at higher risk than mixed breed dogs, and purebred dogs with high inbreeding coefficients may be at

higher risk than those with low inbreeding coefficients

are significant.

In summary, spaying female dogs significantly reduces the risk of mammary cancer (a common cancer),

and the fewer estrus cycles experienced at least up to 30 months of age, the lower the risk will be.

30 months 0.40 (not statistically significant at the P<0.05 level)19 and breast cancer in humans is known to be estrogen activated.th most common cause of years of lost life in Golden Retrievers,10. Considering that the femaleth most common15. A population of mostly intact female Boxers was found to have a 40% chance of developing15. There are some indications that purebred dogs20. More investigation is required to determine if these

the USA.

50-60% of mammary tumors are malignant, for which there is a significant risk of metastasis

tumors in dogs have been found to have estrogen receptors

relative ri

by tigermouse on 15 October 2008 - 16:10

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Joined: Sun Feb 10, 2008 07:53 pm

my old vet said 10 wks so i changed vets later that day lol....numptie

by ziegenfarm on 15 October 2008 - 18:10

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Joined: Sat Sep 20, 2003 04:05 pm

i agree with tigermouse........2-3 yrs is best.

pjp

by Sam1427 on 16 October 2008 - 03:10

Posts: 770
Joined: Sun Feb 17, 2008 02:30 am

I wouldn't spay a female until she was physically and mentally mature, at least 2 or 3 years old. Keeping them inside to prevent an unwanted litter isn't that big a deal, nor is dealing with discharge. It's better for the bitch to have all her hormones so her body and mind mature properly.

Vets get indoctrinated to spay and neuter. They make money off it, of course. Those statistics about mammary tumors are relative and misleading at best. The chance of any bitch getting mammary tumors is quite small.

by Alabamak9 on 16 October 2008 - 03:10

Posts: 406
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2006 02:31 am

You should never spay or neuter a dog before it reaches maturity  at age 2 or 3. Many things are effected including essential hormones needed including thyroid levels which can effect hips and joints issues before the growth plates have fully closed. Vets will do this at age eight weeks which I think is terrible and can do harm to the dogs maturing normally.

The cancer risks are in older dogs not six month old puppies. After a female has ended her breeding career she is spayed because of this concern of course but to date I have never had one female with breast cancer so I think this is a scare tactic used by some vets to promote early spay and neutering. I will not guarantee a dog for hips if the owner has it spayed or neutered before 24 months as this can attribute to HD.

Marlene

by Two Moons on 16 October 2008 - 04:10

Posts: 15866
Joined: Tue Apr 10, 2007 07:21 pm

Waiting until maturity make's the most sense.

Cancer statistic's give me head ache's....   all statistic's do.....  number's on paper.

I am embarrassed that my dog's don't have any rare or exotic physical or mental problem's.

Moon's.

by triodegirl on 16 October 2008 - 13:10

Posts: 1364
Joined: Thu Apr 13, 2006 10:51 pm

moon's what?

by snajper69 on 16 October 2008 - 13:10

Posts: 2033
Joined: Tue Jun 17, 2008 02:31 am

AlabamaK9 makes a very valid statment. I would not spay a female that did not mature yet, I don't care how big the risk is. Do you think animals in a wild get fix(broken). After few recent issues with my local vets I will not take a vet opinion over a breeder, or a bioligists, and most of them agree that it is not a good idea to spay females that are not fully mature yet.

by Two Moons on 16 October 2008 - 13:10

Posts: 15866
Joined: Tue Apr 10, 2007 07:21 pm

Its a joke triodegirl,

I'll die of cancer before my dog does.

If I don't get hit by a car chasing my tail.

by snajper69 on 16 October 2008 - 13:10

Posts: 2033
Joined: Tue Jun 17, 2008 02:31 am

By the way one of my vets who happens to be a breeder of GR as well always sait to me don't fix her before 2 and if you decide you dn't want her bread fix her than. He never recomended fixing females before 2 years his partner did :).


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